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Tech-Related Articles
(October 2001)



Berners-Lee: WWW Royalties Considered Harmful (The Register, October 31st)
One of the Web's most celebrated pioneers has voiced his deep criticism over the proposal that patented - and royalty-carrying - protocols and systems would be accepted as standards by the Web's governing tech body, the W3C. This new development is seen by technological enterprises as a potential cash cow, but may very well cause rifts in the Net's underlying framework if adopted. Read more about the adverse reactions of HP and Apple to the W3C's consideration of supporting RAND in this InfoWorld.com article.

Any Device, Any Content - Any Use for M-Commerce? (M-Commerce Times, October 29th)
One of the biggest hurdles facing a successful takeup of mobile web capabilities and m-commerce relates to the difficulties presently experienced in trying to format content so as to function on a variety of different devices and disparate display types. As this article suggests, though, feasible interoperability technologies may be just around the corner.

Wayback Goes Way Back on the Web (Wired News, October 29th)
It's been a long-time coming, but Alexa and The Internet Archive have finally teamed up to produce an archive that acts as a snapshot record of the entire public web made at various points in time daing back as far as 1996.

Zeus Rips Plaform to Splatter Apache (The Register, October 17th)
Niche server technology provider Zeus is on the verge of releasing Version 4 of its server software, which it claims can speed the delivery of both static and dynamic content by rates as much as 45% faster than chief competitors Apache and iPlanet.

35 Million Broadband Users Predicted by 2006 (CyberAtlas, October 17th)
While interest in embracing nnew technologies seems to be waning in the wake of the bursting of the tech bubble, increased marketing coupld with cost cutting should help drive the uptake of broadband connections by almost half of America's online users by 2006, according to Jupiter Media Metrix.

XML Is About To Rock Your World (NET-ADS, October 16th)
This article presents a brief conceptual introduction to the potential of XML in revolutionizing cross-platform interactivity.

New Standard Worth Its Weight in SALT (internet.com, October 15th)
Having been embraced by many leading technology companies, it seems that SALT - a standard that is expected to tack onto existing markup languages such as HTML and XML - will soon bring voice and other advanced interactivity to a variety of devices.

AT&T Wireless Gets Googled (internet.com, October 15th)
The US-based telco giant has signed a deal with Google that will see the search technology player provide AT&T Wireless customers with access to some 1.6 billion web documents through their mobile phones. Google's technology will also automatically convert the HTML documents to a format that may be displayed with as much fidelity as possible on the tiny devices.

The 'Secret Sauce' to M-Commerce Success (M-Commerce Times, October 15th)
This article looks at some of the barriers facing the successful and pervasive adoption of commerce through mobile devices, with usability seen as a primary focus to increasing the medium's appeal.

Goldman Sachs: No Thrill in 3G (internet.com, October 1st)
With analysts, investors and the general public alike increasingly cautious about the hype surrounding wireless in the hope that it won't drive another bubble of over-inflated projections, the long-awaited rollout of 3G networks in a few regions of the world has been met with criticism and cynicism. It's expected that users will not flock to 3G technologies, simply because interest is not yet there.


 
 
 

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